Chad Hamill, Director

Chad

 

Center for Indigenous Music and Culture   |   Board of Directors
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  • Chad Hamill specializes in the classical music of northern India and Native American music. In addition to teaching at Northern Arizona University, he has taught courses in indigenous and world musics at Cal Arts, Naropa University, Washington State University and the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he received a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology in 2008.
  • After earning a BFA degree in African music from CalArts in 1993, Hamill began his MFA studies in Indian classical vocal music under the direction of Pandit Rajeev Taranath, world-renowned vocalist and master of the sarod. Soon after receiving his degree, Chad was asked to join the North Indian classical department at CalArts where he taught courses in Indian classical theory, sargam, private lessons, and Indian classical ensemble. As a performer he has been featured alongside artists such as Pandit Ramesh Misra, Ustad Roshan Bhartiya, Pandit Nayan Ghosh, Abhiman Kaushal and Arup Chattopadhyay. Chad Hamill continues his lifelong study of Indian classical music under the direction of his guru, Pandit Rajeev Taranath.
  • Prior to earning a PhD in ethnomusicology, Chad Hamill was an active recording artist, releasing four CDs of original music. His most recent CD, "Sympatiko," is a collaborative effort between himself and Brazilian musician Joao Junqueira. During its release, "Sympatiko" received airplay on over 200 radio stations nationwide and was featured on the nationally syndicated show "Native Sounds, Native Voices."
  • A descendant of the Spokane tribe, Hamill's doctoral dissertation, Songs from Spirit: Power and Prayer in the Columbia Plateau, explores traditional song as a catalyst for spiritual power among tribes of the interior Northwest. In addition to regularly giving papers at national meetings for the Society for Ethnomusicology, he has presented papers at Native American and indigenous studies conferences, including AISA (the American Indian Studies Association) and NAISA (the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association). He recently completed a book titled Songs of Power and Prayer in the Columbia Plateau: The Jesuit, the Medicine Man, and the Indian Hymn Singer (Oregon State University Press, 2012), which examines the role of song both Native and Catholic in the perpetuation of indigenous identity, a phenomenon he explores largely through the relationship between Gibson Eli (Hamill's great-uncle) the last medicine man of the Spokan tribe, Fr. Tom Connolly, a Jesuit active in the Columbia Plateau for over half a century, and Mitch Michael, an Indian hymn leader. Songs of Power and Prayer will be a part of an indigenous studies series titled First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies.
  • He currently serves as chair of the Applied Indigenous Studies department at Northern Arizona University.

Betsy Hamill, Director

Betsy
 

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  • Betsy Hamill's background includes extensive musical training from Carnegie Mellon University, where her focus was on the French Horn, and the California institute of the Arts where she received a BFA in World Music with a focus on Ewe Drumming and Dance from Ghana. Throughout different periods of her musical career she has composed many pieces, releasing her first album entitled “Water on the Field.” in 07'
  • Betsy began teaching band 13 years ago and has since started 7 programs at various schools including public, montessori, charter, and waldorf.
  • Betsy began her journey into West African dance 15 years ago when she studied Ewe drumming and dance at the California Institute of the Arts under Alfred Ladzekpo. She has since studied under master dancers such as Maputo Mensah, Djeneba Sako, and Fara Tolno from Ghana, Mali and Guinea and has performed with two dance troupes, Logo Ligi and Kuma Tunyale.
  • In addition to being a full time mama to her two boys and working with the Center for Indigenous Music and Culture, Betsy is teaching a World Music Ensemble and an African Drum and Dance class at the Flagstaff Arts and Leadership Academy.

Bryan Cooperrider, Assistant Professor of Practice, Director of the D4P Program, NAU

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Center for Indigenous Music and Culture   |   Board of Directors
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  • Bryan Cooperrider is an educator, designer, and musician. He is currently the director of the Design4Practice program at Northern Arizona University and an Assistant Professor of Practice in the engineering department at NAU. With a background in art and engineering, he received a masters in product design from Stanford University. He and his wife, also a product designer, run a design consulting firm in Flagstaff.
  • Bryan started playing piano at the age of eight, and his musical journey has never stopped. His love of music extends from American folk and jazz to Brazilian samba and Afro-Cuban roots music. He is a multi-instrumentalist, playing saxophone, guitar and percussion with various groups. In 2008 he founded Sambatuque, a Brazilian percussion bateria dedicated to the rhythms and grooves of the Brazilian nation, and he regularly appears around Flagstaff with his jazz ensemble The Flat Fives. He has composed many original arrangements for a Brazilian percussion ensemble which are frequently performed by Sambatuque.
  • Bryan has studied and collaborated with numerous master musicians. Among them, master Guinean drummer Amara Mansare, Jorge Martin from Recife Brazil, Marcus Santos, from Bahia, Dudu Fuentes from Bangalafumenga, Jorge Alabe, as well as American percussionists Brian Rice, Ami Molinelli, Michael Spiro, and body rhythm master Keith Terry, among others. As a teacher by training, Bryan leads frequent workshops. He has taken kindergartners on a round-the-world music tour, taught adults the intricacies of Brazilian groove, and body rhythm to people of all ages.
  • Bryan has served on local non-profit boards – Northern Arizona Audubon, Flagstaff Sister Cities. He feels that non-profits contribute a strong component of our cultural strength and is committed to helping them serve local communities.

Greg McAllister, Instructor, Ethnic Studies, NAU

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  • Greg McAllister is in the process of completing a masters in history at Northern Arizona University, where he teaches as a part time instructor in Ethnic Studies program. His research is focused on John Taylor, a black man who settled in the Ute borderlands of southwest Colorado during the late 19th century.
  • Greg is a member of the Southwest Oral History Association and has served on their board.
  • Specializing in hand percussion, his style reflects training in West African, Latin American, South Asian and Middle Eastern traditions. In addition to his abiding passion for music, his artistic interests include painting, drawing, and collage.

Moran Rosenthal-Henn, Development and Program Director, Friends of Flagstaff's Future

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  • Originally from Israel, Moran has always been involved in promoting cross cultural dialogue, especially among Jewish and Arab Israeli youth. In 2000 Moran moved to the US earned a bachelor's degree in Conservation Social Sciences and a Master's degree in Environmental Sciences and Policy with an emphasis on integration of Traditional Ecological Knowledge into land management.
  • She worked for the Flagstaff Area National Monuments as the NAGPRA assistant coordinator, and for Grand Canyon National Park as the Ethnographic Database researcher earning much experience in working across the Southwest cultural landscape.
  • Currently, Moran lives in Flagstaff, AZ with her husband and two daughters, works for Friends of Flagstaff's Future as the Development and Program Director, and is the outreach coordinator for Capoeira Amizade, an Afro Brazilian Martial Art School in Flagstaff. The School offers adult, kids, and youth classes and is dedicated to promoting the rich heritage and legacy of the Afro Brazilian Capoeria culture.

Takalay Hamill, CIMC Photographer

Takalay

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Rudy Preston, Web Steward

 

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www.ethos7.com

 

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Center for Indigenous Music and Culture
Flagstaff, Arizona
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(928) 523-3849

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